Bringing the U to You: Rebecca Bendick

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Bringing the U to You
The "Bringing the U to You" Lecture Series is a collaborative effort of the UM Alumni Association and MSU Alumni Foundation.

The U to You Committee is a group of University of Montana and Montana State University alumni committed to connecting the campuses to the Great Falls area through stimulating educational experiences.

Rebecca Bendick, UM
Geologic Hazards and Natural Disasters in Montana and Beyond
February 20, 7:00–9:00 p.m.

Ticket prices
Entire series: $25 (view here)
Individual lecture: $10/general or $5/students
Limited seating available

To purchase tickets
Call 406-899-0277
Tickets also available at Kaufman's

Location
Great Falls College MSU Heritage Hall (map)

Research projects in geophysics and continental tectonics have taken the University of Montana’s Rebecca Bendick around the globe. Her passion to learn about deformation of the Earth’s crust is matched by her interest in the relationship between scientific research and society. She teaches about tectonics, earthquakes and other natural disasters to help people make good decisions about their risks and ways to mitigate them.

In her talk, “Geologic Hazards and Natural Disasters in Montana and Beyond,” Bendick will explore the science and politics of natural disasters, especially earthquakes but also volcanic eruptions, landslides, floods, droughts and wildfires. She will outline the most recent research developments into the basic science of these disasters and how they apply to Montana. She also will discuss how communities can evaluate and mitigate risks.

Born and reared in Rhode Island, Bendick traveled to the Rockies to study for a PhD in geophysics at the University of Colorado after completing bachelor’s degrees in biology and geology at Yale. After receiving her advanced degree in 2000, she and her husband spent three years in the United Kingdom while she worked at the University of Cambridge. She returned to the Rockies for a faculty position at UM in 2005. She has active experiments in Central Asia and East Africa, in addition to Southwest Montana.